A Look at JetBlue’s “Blog and Social Networking Policy”

16 Nov

Ever wonder about what the social media policies for some of your favorite companies includes? (Me too.)

Morgan Johnston, Manager Corporate Communications at JetBlue, shared the company’s public 600-word “Blog and Social Networking Policy” with me. Check it out below and let me know what you think about it in the comments below. Is it what you expected? What didn’t you expect?

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Blog and Social Networking Policy

JetBlue understands that some Crewmembers may wish to create and maintain personal web logs commonly referred to as “blogs” and/or social networks, such as web based discussion or conversation pages (e.g. Facebook and Twitter). While JetBlue respects your right to personal expression, JetBlue expects all Crewmembers to act professionally on the job, and to refrain from behavior, on and off the job, that could adversely impact the Company. Therefore, the following guidelines have been established for posting to blogs and social networking sites:

Personal Expression

Personal blogs contain the views of particular individuals, not JetBlue. If you choose to discuss your employment or identify yourself as a JetBlue Crewmember in any way, you must include a disclaimer clarifying that the views expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of JetBlue. Because customers, vendors, and business partners may nonetheless view you as a spokesperson for JetBlue it is imperative that you be clear and specify that a blog is not a company-sponsored source of communication. Crewmembers should assume at all time that they are representing the Company when engaging in any form of social networking.

Protect Confidential/Proprietary Information

As more fully described in JetBlue’s Confidentiality Policy, you are prohibited from disclosing confidential, proprietary, sensitive and/or trade secret information of JetBlue and other third parties. Such disclosures threaten JetBlue’s intellectual property rights, business relationships with third parties, and compliance with securities laws. Similarly, you may not provide a link from your personal blog to JetBlue’s website, nor use JetBlue trademarks including but not limited to logos or other proprietary images or information. Additionally, JetBlue may have certain rights in any inventions or concepts you create that relate to the Company’s business.

Be Respectful and Exercise Common Sense

JetBlue Crewmembers are a part of building and maintaining a respectful working environment. Blogs must not violate JetBlue’s conduct-related policies including Equal Employment Opportunity (harassment and sexual harassment), Values, etc. If posting to your blog or social networking site, be respectful of others; harassment of any Crewmembers or Business Partners will not be tolerated. Be aware that anyone including other Crewmembers, customers, vendors and business partners, can view your blog, facebook or twitter page while it is actively posted, and may even be able to view its contents after it has been deleted.

Company Time and Company Property

JetBlue’s Internet and Computer Use Policy governs all uses of company computer equipment. Consult this and other related policies in the Crewmember BlueBook before using company equipment for personal use. As described in the policy, JetBlue reserves the right to monitor use of Company-provided and company-owned computer equipment. Blogging must not occur during work hours or through the use of company-provided or company-owned computer equipment.

JetBlue in its sole discretion will determine whether a particular blog or social network posting violates JetBlue policies, Values, or operating procedures. As with all JetBlue policies, a violation of such policy may result in Progressive Guidance, up to and including termination. JetBlue further reserves the right to request Crewmembers refrain from commenting on topics related to JetBlue or if necessary, suspend the blog or social network site altogether if advisable for compliance with securities regulations or applicable laws. Failure to comply may result in Progressive Guidance up to and including termination.

Adherence to all JetBlue’s policies, guidelines, values, and operating procedures is required. Should you have any questions about this policy or how it may apply to your blog, please contact People Resources.

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What are your thoughts on JetBlue’s social media policy? Add them in the comments!

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11 Responses to “A Look at JetBlue’s “Blog and Social Networking Policy””

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  2. http://justlikemefitness.com December 23, 2012 at 12:11 pm #

    This particular blog post A Look at JetBlue’s “Blog and Social
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  3. Damon Klotz September 6, 2011 at 8:04 am #

    They should be crowd sourcing feedback on blogs like yours Erica to improve it!

    I’m currently writing up a social media policy for one of my clients and we cover all the essentials but the overall message is around encouraging their employees to collaborate and engage with the brand and not put the fear of god in them.

    My HR side of me has always stood by this quote “Trust your employees. It’s cheaper and more effective then any other strategy.”

  4. andreaedwards April 20, 2011 at 1:20 am #

    I’m surprised that they even shared this policy – it doesn’t once encourage anyone to embrace blogging, all it focuses on is how using it can potentially result in termination. Why not challenge people to get out there, blog to their hearts content but PLEASE be mindful of our policies, etc…? I’m just a bit surprised. They’re missing a great opportunity right? Who knows what benefits the company could receive if they let people be free? So many businesses remain fearful…

  5. Paul Schreiber November 16, 2010 at 3:37 pm #

    Similarly, you may not provide a link from your personal blog to JetBlue’s website,

    Wow. They really don’t understand the Internet.

    • ericaswallow November 16, 2010 at 4:11 pm #

      Great point, Paul. That’s an odd inclusion.

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